GillyMac Dawn til Dusk Sewathon

If you didn’t already know (how could you not know !) , on 22nd September we held a Dawn til Dusk Sewathon in support of Macmillan Cancer Support. From 7am until 7pm there was a flow of adults and then after school children and teens arriving at the studio in Westfield Road. The participants enthusiastically sewed squares together all day, making 15 quilts over the 12 hours.
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Julia’s First Ever Patchwork

It was a great team and community effort. Pupils, past pupils, friends, and neighbours came together to sew and eat cake ! By sewing precut squares into blocks of three by three, Deborah Ransom and Jean Cozens co-ordinated the assembling of colourful quilts in cot size and bed size. The day flew because of the boundless energy and enthusiasm of the flow of people through the studio on the day. We even had some very young helpers !

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Allegra having a rest !

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Jordi enjoying the Tuffet !

For me, the day was a moment in time of the spirit of sewing within a community of volunteers. That spirit is continuing through a group of volunteers that are helping with all the quilting and binding need for each of the quilts.
All of the quilts made are being donated to Project Linus, a charity which provides handmade quilts to poorly children and child carers across the UK. The quilts made during the Sewathon will be distributed across Berkshire. The day also raised more than £650 for Macmillan Cancer Support which I have just dropped off at the bank.
This isn’t something we can repeat annually as it takes an awful lot of effort by all those involved, but I hope we can have another Dawn til Dusk event in 2018 and maybe even try and break our record of 15 quilts ! I’ll keep you updated with how the completion of the quilts go and the reception we get when they are handed over to Project Linus in November.
Thank you all very much for taking part – it was amazing !
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GillyMac’s Top 10 Patchwork & Quilting Apps

Recently I have been researching the world of applications for patchwork and quilting to see what’s out there. In teaching,  I already regularly use a few, but I was ask to write an article for an online publication so I thought I’d share my top tips. Below you will find a mixture of free and paid for applications all for use in an IOS (Apple) environment. I’ve noted the version and latest development date, as this will also give you an indication of the progressive nature of the app.

10. Doodle Buddy (v1.7 2016)  free – To improve you skills in free motion quilting you need to practice practice practice!! This isn’t always possible at the machine, but using your iPad or iPhone the Doodle Buddy app is like an Etch-a-Sketch (for those of us of a certain age ) allowing you to practice drawing out your quilting designs over coffee, in front of the TV, waiting for kids on the school run or at sport etc… This app is really useful and a must have.image5
9.  Photo Pen HD  – lite version (v1.4 2012) free – having practiced your Free Motion Quilting, (FMQ), now you need to decide how to quilt a real block or quilt. Using this app you import a photo of your block or quilt and use the app to draw your quilting designs on top of the photo. It’s easy and effective. The resulting picture can be saved to your photo stream and printed out to have beside you as you tackle your project on the machine. Brilliant ! We use this application often in my classes.

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8BlockFab (v1 2010) – free.  This is not a quilt design tool but is a library of 70 blocks that you can view in a number of preset colour combinations and as a group of blocks. The app calculates the fabric required for a block, but not for a quilt. The most useful part of this app for me is the preset colour combinations, These are good colour mixes which I have used in other applications and for ideas for my own quilts colour choices.

7.  Quilting Wizard (v1.0.2 2013)- £3.99. This is a low cost quilt design app that allows you to import your own fabric images and incorporate them into over a 100 different preset blocks. Quilts can be made square on or on point, with bindings and sashing options. Fabric requirements are generated, however there is no ability to created your own custom block design.

 6 . ArtRage – ( v2.1 2015) – £3.99.  Built for art drawing with a strong professional development team behind it, this app can be used for patchwork design as taught by Lady Sew & Sew (www.ladysewandsew.co.uk). With this application you are able to import pictures of your fabrics and build bespoke quilt designs (there are no preset blocks). Great for those artists among us who don’t want to be constrained by traditional blocks. ArtRage does not calculate fabric requirements, but you should never rely on apps that do so without calculating fabric requirements yourself anyhow. If you want to use this app for P&Q you will need to go on the course, as currently there is no book or user notes for this use of the application. It is all very useful for free motion design practice as well !

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5 . Craftsy – (v3.3.3 2016)  free – There is nothing like a face-to-face lesson, but coming a close second is the Craftsy platform. This is available on a PC as well, but the Craftsy app is designed for optimum use with Apple devices. Use of the platform is free and you purchase patterns and classes as you want them, however there is a plethora of free stuff available as well. Don’t be the last person to find out about Craftsy – it is great !

4. QuiltingCalc by Robert Kaufmann (v2.3 2014) – free -This is a super useful free app. It calculates the best way to cut shapes from a piece of fabric, how much fabric is needed for backings, borders and bindings, as well as having many different basic measuring features. This is a really useful app to have on an iPhone which can be used in the heat of shopping !

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3. Free Motion Quilting Ideas ( v1.1 2016)  – £2.99 – I bought the book first (Free Motion Quilting Idea Book)which is packed with ideas  and practical applications for quilting basic shapes. The app is just the same, walking you through 16 really useful basic designs and then developing your FMQ by applying those designed to triangles, rectangles, circles etc through the use of embedded videos (so there is no need for WiFi connectivity to use this app).

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2 . Quilting Tutorials by Missouri Star Quilting (v2.3 2015)  – free – I love Jenny from the MSQC she is very entertaining. This application is regularly updated with new classes, as if the 100s of tutorials and quilts already available are not enough. Each tutorial I’ve watched is engaging, and full of useful tips. With this number of tutorials as well as the ability to order fabric via the app you could stay at home for years quilting with Jenny.

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1 . Quiltography –(v1.41  2015 ) £10.99 – yes it is worth it. For the cost of a couple of magazines and a coffee, you will get hours of fun from this application. Use the extensive library of traditional blocks or build  your own custom one on a grid size of your own choice. Photograph and import pictures of your own fabrics and create quilts with borders and sashing with customer or traditional blocks. In addition, for those of us who like pixilated quilts, the app allows you to import a picture, pixilate it using however many colours you wish, and created a pdf pattern for you to follow which includes fabric requirements. There are limitations, I find the fixed nature of the use of borders annoying, but all in all it is easy and enjoyable to use and has all you need to create some great quilts.

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So that it … hours of fun for you with these apps ahead ! Enjoy ! … and in you have questions email me at mail@gillymacdesigns.com.

Free Motion Fear

 

It’s not just you… it is me too…. !

Just lately I have been backing up things to quilt. Sometimes it just happens. I end up with a number of requests for classes and I get the tops made and then slow down at the point of quilting. Often it is because I am musing about a designs to use, but it is regularly about the ‘will it be good enough’ fairy siting on my shoulder (she sits there quite often). The thing is, as with almost everything I do, if a task is simplified,  broken down into chunks and sometimes even scheduled, it all gets done and most times is great !

Here are the quilts that I am working on. There is the Northern Lights Modern Quilt Group Challenge, there is the Circles Table Runner Project and there is the super Library Quilt. Each had their own challenges

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Northen Lights

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Circles Table Runner

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Library Quilt

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The Northern Lights Quilt was an opportunity to stretch myself and practise new designs, but there was much blank space, with no lines or seams to use as guides. So the challenge was to decide what to do, and to start.. just do it !

The Circles Table Runner was a class sample. It needed to be quilted with clean clear, well executed designs which could be replicated in classes. I wanted this to demonstrated how effective walking foot quilting could be.

The Library Quilt was a large project which was daunting in itself on a domestic machine. I wanted to quilt the books using a walking foot, to define them and make them stand out. This would be simple quilting, but will involve a lot of twisting and jiggling of the quilt through my machine. Then for the background (blue) behind the books I planned to do some stiff free motion work. Maybe a paisley design. This quilt is a wall hanging, not a functional quilt and this lends itself to heavier quilting. The size of the quilt means that FMQ will be easier on the machine.

After a week of work … and a lot of ‘having a go’, oodles of tea , the Northern Lights and Circles quilts are finished and the Library quilt is a ‘looking good’ working progress.

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Northern Lights – Reverse View

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Nothern Lights – Quilted Top

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Up Close Northern Lights

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IMG_5737-110 Circles Table Runner – Quilted !

 

It has been really rewarding to just throw myself into it and not worry about small mistakes. I love the finished effects… Now it is your turn… go on.. have a go !

Handbag Projects

3-102-2There is a friend of mine who has introduced me to the concept of having a “handbag project”. She always seems to have a zip lock bag in her handbag which has something creative she can do when she gets the odd moment. She finds this really useful as her children don’t go to school locally and they do a lot of sport, so there are many car journeys for her each week and lots of hanging around and she finds it enjoyable to be able to pull out a few hexagons and sew them together whenever she can.

English Paper Piecing (EPP) is particularly good for handbag projects. ExplIMG_5202-100ained simply, you would draw a shape on paper, (I used freezer paper as it has a wax layer on one size and will temporarily stick to fabric when heated) and cut it out. Hexagons or other basic shapes are easy to start with. Once you have cut around the shapes, iron (or place) them onto the wrong side of the fabric and roughly cut them out. Next fold and iron down the overhang of extra fabric and tack it in place. IMG_5203-101

For a handbag project the roughly cut pieces, a needle, some thread and small scissors can easily be put in a zip lock bag and ported from place to place to be continued whenever the moment is available. This worked really well for me my adventure with Katie to Australia last year, as from Heathrow, there is no problem having small scissors in your hand-luggage. However, Katie was utterly embarrassed when at Singapore, as we changed planes, we were treated as potential terrorists when the scissors showed up on the X-Ray scanner. Our boarding cards were written on and we had to stand at the end of the queue in shame… So if you are taking a handbag project on a plane… check you know the rules of any transiting airport as well as your departing one !

Once there are a number of prepared paper pieces, these can be joined together to form a new textile piece, which maybe an item to be used as embellishment, as with my flowers above, or a new textile based from which to make a quilt, or a smaller item like a bag or a cushion.

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My friend has been using her time all these months to prepare and join tiny 1” hexagons together. A 1” hexagon needs only a tiny scrap of fabric, so she has been doing just that, and using all our scraps up. The resulting piece is still growing and is now only just small enough to be considered a handbag project. Without a doubt the resulting piece will be an heirloom after all this work.

Lindsey's Masterpiece ... So Far ...

Lindsey’s Masterpiece … So Far …